Numbers

6-9 Sharing a Common Border

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Sharing a Common Border

  The United States and Mexico share a 2,000 mile border.  This border stretches from the Pacific Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico.

  A border can be formed in several ways.  A physical barrier such as a mountain range or a river can form a border.  Part of the border between Mexico and the United States is a river called the Rio Bravo del Norte, which is located in Mexico.

  Another kind of border can be cultural.  The Mexican/U.S. border separates two societies with very different cultural roots and histories.  The United States is mostly Protestant in religion and English in language.  Mexico's culture is a result of a mix of Spanish-Catholic influence and Indian traditions.

  Borders can separate and divide.  Mexico and the United States depend upon and influence each other.  Mexico (of all the world's countries) is the third in the value of goods it buys from the United States, and fourth in the value of goods it sells to the United States.  United States investments were very important in Mexico's industrial development.  The United States has drawn very heavily on Mexican raw materials and labor.  Many U. S. manufacturing plants have opened in Mexico.  These plants are called maquiladoras.  These plants import parts to be assembled at low cost by Mexican workers.

  As you cross the border the differences between these two countries is very evident.  This mixing of people and the exchange of goods that takes place creates a region where Mexican and U.S. cultures blend.

 

Answer the questions below

The main idea of this passage is

the only kind of border is physical.

the Mexican/U.S. border, and its effects upon both countries.

borders separate and divide.

 
The 2,000 mile border shared by the United States and Mexico stretches from the Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico.
 
 Part of the border between Mexico and the United States is a .
 
The United States is mostly in religion and English in language.
 
U.S. manufacturing plants in  are called maquiladoras.
 
 Maquiladoras import parts to be assembled

by U.S. workers.

at high cost by Mexican workers.

at low cost by Mexican workers.

 
Borders can separate and .
 
This passage says a physical barrier such as a range or a river can form a border.
 
The Mexican/U.S. border separates two societies with very different roots and histories.
 
The mixing of people and the exchange of goods that takes place creates a region where Mexican and U.S. cultures .

 

 

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