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615-2 Mrs. Frisby/Rats of NIMH (4-6)

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Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIHM
 

Possible Answers

 

1. What is meant by the following comparison used by the author when explaining a shrew?  A shrew is a tiny creature scarcely bigger than a peanut, but with wit as sharp as its teeth.
Possible Answer:  I think the author is trying to tell the reader that even though a shrew is a very tiny animal it is a very cleaver and wise animal.  It is as clever and wise as its sharp teeth. It is as tiny as a peanut.

 

2.  Create a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting a mouse and a shrew.
Possible Differences: shrew is smaller and has a bigger snout, mice can be grey or brown
Possible Similarities: both small, both live underground

 

3.  Explain why you believe Mrs. Frisby was not killed by Dragon the cat as she passed by him.
Possible Answer:  I believe Dragon was fast asleep in the sun and did not even notice Mrs. Frisby.  When cats lie in the sun they get very drowsy and are many times unaware of what is going on because they are so comfortable.

 

4.  Mrs. Frisby observes a group of rats marching along as if they were soldiers.  This is a simile because a comparison is being made using the word like or as.  Develop eight sentences using similes.
Possible Similes:
The lake looked like a mirror.
The sun was as warm as a fire.

 

5.  Why do you think owls are characterized as being "wise" birds?
Possible Answer:  I think owls are known to be wise because every book we read tells us that.  From when we are very little children we are told that owls are wise birds.  Who has not heard the phrase?  a wise old owl

 

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